Tag: nuclear disarmament

One night in Bangkok

An overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Southeast Asia.

By ILPI
23 November 2016

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This article provides an overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament efforts in Southeast Asia, exploring, in particular, the establishment of the Southeast Asia nuclear-weapon-free zone (SEANWFZ). The paper also considers the role of Southeast Asian states in the humanitarian discourse on nuclear disarmament and in international efforts to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons.

Implications of a nuclear weapons ban treaty for Japan

Japan—both a nuclear umbrella state and the only country to have suffered attacks by nuclear weapons—will be facing some very difficult decisions as the process towards a treaty prohibiting nuclear weapons moves forward.

By Nobuo Hayashi  and Hirofumi Tosaki 
November 2016

On 27 October 2016, the UN General Assembly’s First Committee voted to commence negotiations in 2017 for the adoption of a legally-binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons. This latest development in the movement known as the “Humanitarian Initiative” comes at a time when the divide between the proponents and opponents of a nuclear weapons ban has become increasingly entrenched.

Under my umbrella

Understanding the terms ‘nuclear umbrella’ and ‘nuclear umbrella state’

By ILPI
5 August 2016

The term ‘nuclear umbrella’ is frequently used to describe military alliances that maintain the option of using nuclear weapons in their collective defence. Yet despite its widespread use, the concept lacks a precise definition, and there does not seem to be agreement on exactly which states should be referred to as ‘nuclear umbrella states’.

The road to Pelindaba

An overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Africa

By ILPI
29 July 2016

This article provides an overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Africa. It explores the process that led to the establishment of an African nuclear-weapon-free zone, and discusses the terms of its founding document, the Pelindaba Treaty. It also discusses the role of African states in recent and on-going disarmament processes such as the review cycle of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Humanitarian Initiative. The article concludes with a discussion of the future of African states’ engagement in the movement towards a world free of nuclear weapons.

Trident renewed

On 18 July, the British Parliament voted to maintain the United Kingdom’s nuclear-weapons capability for the foreseeable future.

By Kjølv Egeland
19 July 2016

The debate in the House of Commons consisted, as Orwell once wrote of political language in general, ‘largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness.’

Spelling Tlatelolco

An overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Latin America and the Caribbean

By ILPI
5 July 2016

This article provides an overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Latin America and the Caribbean. A particular emphasis is placed on the Latin American and Caribbean nuclear-weapon-free zone. We discuss the terms of the Treaty and how the zone came to include states that were initially reluctant to join it. With this as a backdrop, we also consider the role of Latin American and Caribbean states in ongoing efforts to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons.

Rapport fra multilateralismens gravkammer

Hva skal man gjøre med et internasjonalt forhandlingsforum som ikke forhandler?

By Magnus Løvold

Dypt inne i det multilaterale diplomatiets mørke irrganger, fjernt fra offentlighetens oppmerksomhet, sitter representanter fra 65 land og snakker om internasjonal nedrustning av atomvåpen og andre masseødeleggelsesvåpen – nær tjue år på overtid.

Change or perish

For the second time in four years, states interested in discussing nuclear disarmament are circumventing the Conference on Disarmament. The CD must change or perish.

By Kjølv Egeland
27 January 2016

The Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva—often presented as the world’s ‘sole multilateral negotiating body for disarmament’—was created as a successor to the Committee on the Conference on Disarmament at the First United Nations Special Session on Disarmament (UNSSOD-1) in 1978. The creation of the CD was seen as a victory for neutral and non-aligned states at the time, as it increased their representation and made conference presidency rotate among all members