Tag: Humanitarian Initiative

One night in Bangkok

An overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Southeast Asia.

By ILPI
23 November 2016

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This article provides an overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament efforts in Southeast Asia, exploring, in particular, the establishment of the Southeast Asia nuclear-weapon-free zone (SEANWFZ). The paper also considers the role of Southeast Asian states in the humanitarian discourse on nuclear disarmament and in international efforts to prohibit and eliminate nuclear weapons.

The road to Pelindaba

An overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Africa

By ILPI
29 July 2016

This article provides an overview of the history and politics of nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament in Africa. It explores the process that led to the establishment of an African nuclear-weapon-free zone, and discusses the terms of its founding document, the Pelindaba Treaty. It also discusses the role of African states in recent and on-going disarmament processes such as the review cycle of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Humanitarian Initiative. The article concludes with a discussion of the future of African states’ engagement in the movement towards a world free of nuclear weapons.

Regional roundtable meeting in Pretoria

On 17-18 February the WMD project of the International Law and Policy Institute (ILPI) held its 11th regional roundtable meeting on nuclear weapons outside Pretoria, South Africa.

By Torbjørn Graff Hugo

The meeting was organized in collaboration with the South African-based Institute for Security Studies (ISS) and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The purpose of the roundtable was to bring together key government stakeholders from the African continent to discuss both substantive and process-related aspects of an international nuclear disarmament, with a particular focus on a planned Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) in Geneva. A key issue to be explored was the role of Africa and African states in this field.

Roundtable discussion in San José

On 19–20 November 2015, the WMD project of International Law and Policy Institute (ILPI) organised its tenth regional roundtable meeting on nuclear weapons in Costa Rica

By Torbjørn Graff Hugo
26 November 2015

The meeting was organised in collaboration with the Costa Rican Ministry of Foreign Affairs and brought together 17–18 participants, primarily government officials from Latin America and the Caribbean. The main objective of the roundtable meeting was to bring together key stakeholders from the region of Latin America and the Caribbean, including government officials, academics and civil society actors, to discuss both substantive and process-related aspects of international nuclear disarmament.

Now what, NPT?

On June 18 ILPI’s WMD project organized a panel discussion about the prospects for progress in international disarmament after the failure to reach agreement at the 2015 Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in New York in May

By Magnus Løvold
21 June 2015

From the left: Sigrid Heiberg, Øistein Mjærum, Sverre Lodgaard, Liv Tørres, and Gro Nystuen.

On May 22, after weeks of intense negotiations and discussions at the UN Headquarters in New York, it became clear that the 190 member of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) had failed to reach agreement on an outcome document. This breakdown in the diplomatic endeavor to move the world closer to the full elimination of nuclear weapons was the topic of a panel discussion organized by ILPI at Litteraturhuset in Oslo on June 18.

The fairness dimension

A treaty banning nuclear weapons would be worthwhile whether it leads to physical disarmament or not

By Kjølv Egeland
2 June 2015

The Non-Proliferation Treaty is an intrinsically unfair Treaty, which divides the world between “haves” and “have nots”’, the Brazilian delegation maintained in a statement to the NPT Review Conference in 2010. Five years later, at the 2015 Review Conference, the South African delegation asserted that ‘we can no longer afford to strike hollow agreements every five years which only seem to perpetuate the status quo. The time has come to bring a decisive end to what amounts to “nuclear apartheid”’. Over the last five years, a perception of nuclear colonialism, P5 arrogance, and a generally fraudulent nature of nuclear politics has proliferated. But such sentiments are hardly new. The ‘fairness dimension’ of nuclear disarmament has coexisted with the ‘humanitarian’ and ‘security dimensions’ all along. But with the ban-treaty option on the table, states are in a position to do something about it.

Roundtable discussion in Bangkok

On 26–27 March 2015, the WMD project of International Law and Policy Institute (ILPI) organised its ninth regional roundtable meeting on nuclear weapons in Bangkok, Thailand

By Torbjørn Graff Hugo & Magnus Løvold
19 May 2015

The meeting was organized in collaboration with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Thailand (TMFA) and brought together more than 30 participants mainly from the Asia-Pacific region, including government officials (from 13 different states), academics and civil society actors. The main objective was to share thoughts and ideas on how the humanitarian initiative on nuclear weapons can be taken forward, and specifically on how to close the ‘legal gap’ identified at the Vienna Conference on the Humanitarian Impact of Nuclear Weapons.

Scope of action

An overview of the issues, policy positions and possible outcomes of scenarios at the 2015 Review Conference of the NPT.

By Magnus Løvold
5 May 2015

click to enlargeOn Monday 27 April, Ambassador Taous Feroukhi of Algeria opened the 2015 Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In the weeks leading up to 22 May 2015, when the 2015 NPT Review Conference comes to a close, States Parties will review the implementation of the treaty and possibly agree on future actions.